01394 460469 rendlesham@naunton.net
Archaeological Investigation to be made Public

Archaeological Investigation to be made Public

The results of a six-year archaeological investigation into what experts believe was once the royal centre of the East Anglian Kingdom will be made public at a one-day conference this September. It has been two years since archaeologists revealed they had discovered evidence of a settlement on Rendlesham farmland that may have been home to the ancient tribe responsible for the famous Sutton Hoo ship burial. Fragments of jewellery and coins found during the dig, which took place in secret from 2008-2014, were thought to confirm the eighth-century writings of Northumbrian monk, the Venerable Bede, who described the village as the royal residence of Rendil. The six-year survey was launched after Suffolk County Council’s archaeology service was alerted to evidence of illegal treasure hunters descending on the land owned by Sir Michael Bunbury. When preliminary metal detecting work showed that the fields being looted contained high-status Anglo-Saxon objects, surveyors extended their search across the Naunton Hall estate, where almost 4,000 objects were unearthed, including coins suggesting evidence of trading activity in the seventh and eighth centuries. A number of gold, silver and bronze coins, along with fragments of jewellery, went on display for the first time at the National Trust’s Sutton Hoo visitor centre in March 2014. September’s conference at the Apex, in Bury St Edmunds, will present the results of the archaeological investigation in greater detail. The event is due to be opened by Suffolk County Council’s Matthew Hicks and Sir Michael Bunbury, followed by expert talks on subjects including the national and international significance of Rendlesham, the changing geographies of early medieval England and the place names...
Anglo-Saxon Rendlesham – One-day conference

Anglo-Saxon Rendlesham – One-day conference

At the Apex, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk Saturday 24th September 2016, 10am-5pm Programme: 10.00 am Arrival and coffee 10.30-10.50am Introductions by Matthew Hicks (SCC) and Sir Michael Bunbury (landowner) 10.50-12.15pm Morning Session: Chaired by Leslie Webster Speakers: On the results of the current project: Chris Scull, Faye Minter, Jude Plouviez, Andy Woods, and Charlotte Scull 12.15-1.15pm Buffet lunch provided 1.15-2.30pm Afternoon Session 1: Chaired by Catherine Hills Speakers: Kelly Kilpatrick –The Place-names of a Royal Anglo-Saxon Landscape: a Toponymic Survey of Rendlesham and the Deben Valley Tom Williamson – Rendlesham in Context: the changing geographies of early medieval England 2.30-3.00pm Tea and biscuits 3.00- 4.15pm Afternoon session 2: Chaired by Martin Carver Speakers: Andrew Rogerson – Regional perspective from Norfolk Chris Scull –The national and international significance of Rendlesham 4.15 Concluding remarks – Martin Carver 4.30...
Church Restoration Project

Church Restoration Project

St Gregory’s Church, Rendlesham, is thought to have been built in the 14th century on the site of an Anglo Saxon pagan temple. The Venerable Bede writes at length of Rendlesham as the site of King Redwald’s Royal palace and estate. Redwald was baptised and converted to Christianity in this place by Augustine who was sent by Pope Gregory to convert pagans in the 6th Century. For more up-to-date information please click...
Village of Kings discovered in Suffolk

Village of Kings discovered in Suffolk

The people who lived at Rendlesham had widespread foreign contacts. Overseas traders came to sell their goods, and delegations to the King from other rulers brought diplomatic gifts.