01394 460469 rendlesham@naunton.net

Archaeological Investigation to be made Public

Archaeological Investigation to be made Public

The results of a six-year archaeological investigation into what experts believe was once the royal centre of the East Anglian Kingdom will be made public at a one-day conference this September.

It has been two years since archaeologists revealed they had discovered evidence of a settlement on Rendlesham farmland that may have been home to the ancient tribe responsible for the famous Sutton Hoo ship burial.

Fragments of jewellery and coins found during the dig, which took place in secret from 2008-2014, were thought to confirm the eighth-century writings of Northumbrian monk, the Venerable Bede, who described the village as the royal residence of Rendil.

The six-year survey was launched after Suffolk County Council’s archaeology service was alerted to evidence of illegal treasure hunters descending on the land owned by Sir Michael Bunbury.

When preliminary metal detecting work showed that the fields being looted contained high-status Anglo-Saxon objects, surveyors extended their search across the Naunton Hall estate, where almost 4,000 objects were unearthed, including coins suggesting evidence of trading activity in the seventh and eighth centuries.

Picture3

A number of gold, silver and bronze coins, along with fragments of jewellery, went on display for the first time at the National Trust’s Sutton Hoo visitor centre in March 2014.

September’s conference at the Apex, in Bury St Edmunds, will present the results of the archaeological investigation in greater detail.

The event is due to be opened by Suffolk County Council’s Matthew Hicks and Sir Michael Bunbury, followed by expert talks on subjects including the national and international significance of Rendlesham, the changing geographies of early medieval England and the place names of the royal Anglo-Saxon landscape in Suffolk.

The conference takes place from 10am-5pm on Saturday, September 24. Tickets are £20 and include a buffet lunch and refreshments.

Visit heritage.suffolk.gov.uk/rendlesham-conference-2016 for more information.

‘Village of kings’ discovery to be subject of September conference

It has been two years since archaeologists revealed they had discovered evidence of a settlement on Rendlesham farmland that may have been home to the ancient tribe responsible for the famous Sutton Hoo ship burial.

Fragments of jewellery and coins found during the dig, which took place in secret from 2008-2014, were thought to confirm the eighth-century writings of Northumbrian monk, the Venerable Bede, who described the village as the royal residence of Rendil.

The six-year survey was launched after Suffolk County Council’s archaeology service was alerted to evidence of illegal treasure hunters descending on the land owned by Sir Michael Bunbury.

When preliminary metal detecting work showed that the fields being looted contained high-status Anglo-Saxon objects, surveyors extended their search across the Naunton Hall estate, where almost 4,000 objects were unearthed, including coins suggesting evidence of trading activity in the seventh and eighth centuries.

A number of gold, silver and bronze coins, along with fragments of jewellery, went on display for the first time at the National Trust’s Sutton Hoo visitor centre in March 2014.

September’s conference at the Apex, in Bury St Edmunds, will present the results of the archaeological investigation in greater detail.Picture1

The event is due to be opened by Suffolk County Council’s Matthew Hicks and Sir Michael Bunbury, followed by expert talks on subjects including the national and international significance of Rendlesham, the changing geographies of early medieval England and the place names of the royal Anglo-Saxon landscape in Suffolk.

The conference takes place from 10am-5pm on Saturday, September 24. Tickets are £20 and include a buffet lunch and refreshments.

Visit heritage.suffolk.gov.uk/rendlesham-conference-2016 for more information.

Article courtesy of EADT – 13 April 2016